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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes) found in the catalog.

Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)

Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes)

  • 270 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Evolution,
  • Science,
  • Population Genetics,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life Sciences - Biology - General,
  • Science / Biology

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsB. C. Clarke (Editor), L. Partridge (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages182
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7738785M
    ISBN 100521380014
    ISBN 109780521380010
    OCLC/WorldCa233525459

    Negative frequency-dependent selection is a form of selection in which common phenotypes are selected against. One type of negative frequency-dependent selection occurs when rare phenotypes of a prey species confer higher fitness because predators do not recognize the organisms as prey. This is known as apostatic selection.   When individuals' fitnesses depend on the genetic composition of the population in which they are found, selection is then frequency dependent. Frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is often invoked as a heuristic explanation for the maintenance of large numbers of alleles at a locus. The pairwise interaction model is a general model of FDS via intraspecific competition at the genotypic level.

      There are two types of frequency dependent selection, positive and negative. In the positive case more common forms have an advantage whereas in negative frequency dependent selection less common forms have an advantage. The classic example of pos. Frequency-Dependent Selection. Another type of selection, frequency-dependent selection, favors phenotypes that are either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection).We can observe an interesting example of this type of selection in a unique group of Pacific Northwest lizards.

    Negative frequency-dependent selection. The first explicit statement of frequency dependent selection appears to have been by E.B. Poulton in with reference to the way that predators could maintain color polymorphisms in their prey. [1] [2]Perhaps the best known early modern statement of the principle in the twentieth century was the discussion by Bryan Clarke of apostatic selection (a. Buy Frequency-dependent selection: Proceedings of a Royal Society Discussion Meeting held on 24 and 25 June on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.


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Frequency-Dependent Selection (Royal Society Discussion Volumes) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Frequency-dependent selection in side-blotched lizards: A yellow-throated side-blotched lizard is smaller than either the blue-throated or orange-throated males and appears a bit like the females of the species, allowing it to sneak copulations. Frequency-dependent selection allows for both common and rare phenotypes.

Frequency-dependent selection occurs when the fitness of a genotype depends on its frequency. It is possible for the fitness of a genotype to increase (positively frequency-dependent) or decrease (negatively frequency-dependent) as the genotype frequency in the population increases.

Frequency Dependent Selection. Frequency dependent selection suggests that minority strategies may be beneficial as a result of interactions with qualities of the typical strategy: Consider a simple two-strategy game consisting Frequency-Dependent Selection book two types, exploiters and cooperators that due to their strategy are able to produce a surplus.

Florian Loffing, Norbert Hagemann, in Laterality in Sports, Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection. Frequency-dependent selection describes “a process in which the survival/fitness advantage of a type is dependent on its relative frequency” (Takahashi & Kawata,p.

).Negative frequency-dependent selection (NFDS) is at work if a type’s advantage increases as its relative. Frequency‐dependent selection occurs when the fitness of a genotype depends on whether it is rare or common, that is, an individual's fitness is affected by allele or genotype frequencies of other individuals in the same population.

Pathogen–host coevolution, sex ratio, self‐sterility alleles and mimicry are situations where frequency Cited by: 1. Frequency-dependent selection is an evolutionary process by which the fitness of a phenotype or genotype depends on the phenotype or genotype composition of a given population.

In positive frequency-dependent selection, the fitness of a phenotype or genotype increases as it becomes Frequency-Dependent Selection book common.; In negative frequency-dependent selection, the fitness of a phenotype or genotype.

Frequency-dependent selection may arise because the environment is heterogeneous and because different genotypes can better exploit different subenvironments.

When a genotype is rare, the subenvironments that it exploits better will be relatively abundant. But as the genotype becomes common, its favoured subenvironment becomes saturated.

Frequency-dependent Selection. Another type of selection, called frequency-dependent selection, favors phenotypes that are either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection).

An interesting example of this type of selection is seen in a unique group of lizards of the Pacific Northwest. In principle, frequency-dependent selection gives a much more robust mechanism that can give an advantage to rare alleles, and thereby maintain variation.

Even here, though, many of the proposed mechanisms require either strong selection or a delicate balancing of parameters, e.g., the Levene model (Levene ) or, more generally, Maynard. Frequency-dependent selection favors phenotypes that are either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection).

We can observe an interesting example of this type of selection in a unique group of Pacific Northwest lizards. frequency-dependent selection any SELECTION in which the FITNESS of genotypes is directly related to the proportions of the various PHENOTYPES present in a population, so that the frequency of the more common types is decreased and the less common types is increased.

Such selection pressure often produces a stable GENETIC POLYMORPHISM and when it involves predation is referred to as.

The Definition of Frequency-Dependent Rejection Abstract: The frequency-dependent rejection (FDR) terminology is frequently used in EMC analysis, especially in the report literature, and hence it appears useful to discuss it's general definition.

selection types, apostatic selection. Cite this entry as: () Frequency-Dependent Selection. In: Encyclopedia of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics and Informatics. The Colours of Animals is a zoology book written in by Sir Edward Bagnall Poulton (–).

It was the first substantial textbook to argue the case for Darwinian selection applying to all aspects of animal book also pioneered the concept of frequency-dependent selection and introduced the term "aposematism".

The book begins with a brief account of the physical causes. Frequency Dependent Selection. Dorak, M.D., Ph.D. An evolutionary process where the fitness of a phenotype is dependent on the relative frequency of other phenotypes in the population is called frequency dependent selection.

In positive frequency dependent selection, the fitness of a phenotype increases as it becomes more common. Frequency-dependent selection is commonly considered in speciation models because it can, under the right circumstances, generate disruptive selection while maintaining a polymorphism.

Frequency-dependent selection arises under a wide variety of different circumstances: for example, when individuals compete for resources, when predators more. Frequency-dependent selection is the phenomenon in which the fitness of a particular phenotype is dependant on the composition of the genotype of the entire population.

Other types of selection include frequency-dependent selection, in which individuals with either common (positive frequency-dependent selection) or rare (negative frequency-dependent selection) phenotypes are selected for.

Finally, sexual selection results from the fact that one sex has more variance in the reproductive success than the other.

Optimal Foraging Theory: A Critical Review G H Pyke Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics Evolution of Diversity in Warning Color and Mimicry: Polymorphisms, Shifting Balance, and Speciation James Mallet and Mathieu Joron Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics The Developmental, Physiological, Neural, and Genetical Causes and Consequences of Frequency-Dependent Selection Cited by: Free shipping for non-business customers when ordering books at De Gruyter Online.

Please find details to our shipping fees here. RRP: Recommended Retail Price. Print Flyer; Overview; Content; Book Book Series.

Previous chapter. Next chapter. Frequency-Dependent Selection and the ABO Blood Groups LIVINGSTONE, FRANK B. 30,00 € / $ / £. positive frequency dependent selection. when heterozygoe is favored each homozygote. disruptive selection. the mean is selected against and the extremes are selected for.

directional selection. selection against one extreme shifts the mean toward the other extreme. stabilizing selection. Positive frequency-dependent selection (FDS) is a selection regime where the fitness of a phenotype increases with its frequency, and it is thought to underlie important adaptive strategies resting on signaling and communication.

However, whether and how positive FDS truly operates in nature remains unknown, which hampers our understanding of.Frequency-dependent selection is common, though only some experiments show apostatic selection.

Selective behaviour is often variable within a single experiment, making replication important.